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REPERTUAR

3.10.2014 piątek
PREMIERA!
Nine | Duża Scena
19:00 - PREMIERA
4.10.2014 sobota
5.10.2014 niedziela
New season
For the official opening of the new season we rehearse Nine, the musical by Arthur Kopit and Maury Yeston, known to the Polish audience from a film version by Rob Marshall (2009). The story is inspired by Federico Fellini's masterpiece 8 1/2 and opened on Broadway in 1982. And although the classic f...
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Award-winning Capitol
The Musical Theatre Capitol after modernization and reconstruction has been awarded with The 1st Prize and Grand Prix in Piękny Wrocław (Beautiful Wrocław) contest. This has been the 14th edition of the contest organized yearly by The President of Wrocław and Towarzystwo Miłośników Wrocławia...
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110 thousand spectators in the season!
Our first season after renovation of the theatre building is a huge success! After a massive reconstruction we have opened the theatre on September 28, 2013 with Bulgakov's Master and Margarita adapted and directed by Wojciech Kościelniak and with music by Piotr Dziubek. 4 premieres of the season ...
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NEWS

Frankenstein

MUSICAL BASED ON THE NOVEL BY MARY SHELLEY

DURATION 2 H 50 MIN WITH ONE INTERMISSION

SONGS CD AVAILABLE IN THE THEATRE SHOP

SPEKTACLE IN THE PROGRAM OF 33RD WARSAW THEATRE MEETINGS

PREMIERE 23 NOVEMBER 2011 

Script and direction: WOJCIECH KOŚCIELNIAK
Songs lyrics: RAFAŁ DZIWISZ
Music: PIOTR DZIUBEK
Stage design: DAMIAN STYRNA
Costumes: KATARZYNA PACIOREK
Choreography: BEATA OWCZAREK AND JANUSZ SKUBACZKOWSKI
Assistant to The Director: AGNIESZKA KOZAK

CAST

Victor Frankenstein: MARIUSZ KILJAN  / MARIUSZ OSTROWSKI 
Marcus Grossman (The Janitor), The Monster: CEZARY STUDNIAK
Elisabeth: AGNIESZKA ORYŃSKA-LESICKA  / HELENA SUJECKA 
Henry Clervall: MIKOŁAJ WOUBISHET
Victor's Mother: JUSTYNA SZAFRAN  / MAŁGORZATA SZEPTYCKA
Professor Albert Waldmann: ANDRZEJ GAŁŁA
Giulia (The Glass Woman): MAGDALENA WOJNAROWSKA
Igor (The Hunchback): BARTOSZ PICHER
The Blind Man: ADRIAN KĄCA
Agata (The Blind Man's Wife): JUSTYNA ANTONIAK  / EWA SZLEMPO 
The Schoolgirl: ELŻBIETA KŁOSIŃSKA
The Priest: TOMASZ SZTONYK
The Policeman: TOMASZ LESZCZYŃSKI
Marija: EWELINA ADAMSKA-PORCZYK
The Immobile Soldier: PIOTR MAŁECKI
The Italian Singer: TOMASZ SZTONYK
The Audience Woman: MAŁGORZATA FIJAŁKOWSKA
The Dead Soldiers: PIOTR GAJDA-SUS, TOMASZ LESZCZYŃSKI, MACIEJ MACIEJEWSKI 

Dancers: EWELINA ADAMSKA-PORCZYK, BOŻENA BUKOWSKA, DOMINIKA JÓZEFOWIAK, MAJA LEWICKA, KATARZYNA MAŁECKA, MICHAŁ GUZENDA, PIOTR MAŁECKI, JAN NYKIEL, MICHAŁ PIETRZAK, MICHAŁ SZYMAŃSKI

Choir, Pupils, Nuns, Monks, Deers, Rabbits, Wedding Party Guests, Venetians, Policemen, Londoners, Students, Workers, New People: EWELINA ADAMSKA-PORCZYK, JUSTYNA ANTONIAK/ EWA SZLEMPO, BOŻENA BUKOWSKA, MAŁGORZATA FIJAŁKOWSKA, DOMINIKA JÓZEFOWIAK, MAJA LEWICKA, KATARZYNA MAŁECKA, EMOSE UHUNMWANGHO, PIOTR GAJDA-SUS, MICHAŁ GUZENDA,  ADRIAN KĄCA, TOMASZ LESZCZYŃSKI, MACIEJ MACIEJEWSKI, PIOTR MAŁECKI, JAN NYKIEL, MICHAŁ PIETRZAK, TOMASZ SZTONYK, MICHAŁ SZYMAŃSKI

Musicians: PIOTR DZIUBEK (leader/ guitar, piano, harmonium, accordeon, percussion instruments, virtual instruments programming), ADAM SKRZYPEK (doubole bass, bass), MICHAŁ LASOTA (percussion), IWAR ROMANEK (acoustic / electric guitars), ZUZANNA DUDZIC-KARKULOWSKA (violin), WOJCIECH HAZUKA (violin), KRZYSZTOF IWANOWICZ (violin), MAŁGORZATA KOGUT-ŚLANDA (violin), OLGA KWIATEK (violin), MARTA SOCHAL-MATUSZYK (violin), TOMASZ MIROWSKI (violin), BEATA WOŁCZYK (violin), DOROTA ŻAK (violin), SZYMON KRUK (viola), MAGDALENA GOŁĘBERSKA (viola),PAWEŁ BRZYCHCY (viola),ADAM LEPKA (trumpet), MICHAŁ SICIŃSKI (clarinet, bass clarinet ), ARTUR TOMCZAK (trombone), PIOTR HAŁAJ (tuba).


 

A musical adaptation of the story of Doctor Frankenstein and the monster. Featuring a plenitude of actors and some great music, the show could be labeled as a thriller. An ironic thriller to be exact.

The script of the play is based on the famous novel by Mary Shelley published in 1818. The genuine idea, however, originated two years earlier, at Lake Geneva in Switzerland. 
The year of 1816 was recorded in the annals of meteorology as “the year without summer”. The reason behind such dreadful weather was an eruption of Mount Tambora, a volcano in Indonesia, which occurred in April that year. Already in May the days grew dark, cold and cloudy; the rain just kept coming.
No wonder then Mary Shelley, along with her husband and a group of their friends, including Lord Byron and John Polidori, spent most of their holidays in Switzerland sitting at home. On a certain night, trying to get away from boredom, they decided to hold a competition to see who could come up with the most scary story. That was the night Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein came to being.
It is believed that Mary Shelley was inspired by a gruesome story about undertakers from the town of Frankenstein (known today as Zabkowice Slaskie, Poland), a story that was quite popular in Europe at that time. This could at least explain the etymology of the title.

Mary Shelley’s book has never ceased to inspire writers, poets and filmmakers. There are countless works that try to tell the same story or reinterpret it in a thousand different ways.  The most famous one, however, is the movie made in 1931, with Boris Karloff as the monster. The musical staged in Capitol follows exactly the aesthetics employed in that particular picture.
The script of the play, however, is somewhat different from the original story, much as the main storyline has been preserved. The list of modifications includes character building, dialogues, themes and plot threads.

Wojciech Koscielniak, the author of the script and director of the play:
’Above all, Frankenstein is about toying with a horror show, the terrifying, German Expressionism, the cinematography of old, and the stereotype of a comic book. It is a dialogue with kitsch, clichés and cheap narrative tricks. A game of death and murder. It is about taming and making death harmless, but also about showing respect to it, paying homage even. I take this story of a monster created by one crazy scientist as a myth about a man who became overwhelmed with his very own disappointment toward the existing order of things. It is a story of a boastful man who more than anything believed he was a genius. That belief of his turned out to be a powerful force, both creative and destructive.’

‘Koscielniak’s Frankenstein is a wonderful theatrical playground. A masterfully planned game of artistic conventions.’ Grzegorz Chojnowski, Radio Wroclaw

’Koscielniak manages to strike the perfect balance between reflecting upon the condition of this modern world, overshadowed with fear and uncertainty, and providing the audience with entertainment.’ Magda Piekarska, Gazeta Wyborcza Wroclaw

‘A nightmare through and through, the play still delivers much more fun and laughter than fear. Frankenstein was supposed to give us entertainment. And it does. Totally.’ Marcin Szewczyk at the Dla Studenta website

’An epic combination of a musical, a horror show and a comedy. I don’t think we have ever witnessed anything quite like that here in Wroclaw.’ Jakub Kasperkiewicz, Kontrast (a magazine for students)

‘This show should owe its success to a great cast and interesting music works composed by Piotr Dziubek. It's been a long time since I got so intrigued by music employed in a musical.’
Agnieszka Serlikowska, Nowa Sila Krytyczna

’Costumes fitting for the occasion, make-up just as ghastly as it should be, splendid choreography and a stark stage scenery relying on vivid videos; all this translates into a very successful theatrical performance.’ Mariusz Urbanek, Kulturozerca (a blog at the Wroclove 2012 website)

‘On the one hand, it is an unbridled fantasy about a theme that has grown to be a great pop-cultural myth, on the other it is a staged treatise on the anatomy of horror aesthetics, its most basic tools and pastiche-like transformations. Koscielniak’s Frankenstein can be read like a palimpsest that comprises layers of genre clichés and inspirations coming from the history of horror movies, from James Whale’s 1931 Frankenstein, via Mel Brooks's parodies, to Tim Burton’s animated variations on the horror genre. It can also be interpreted as a subversive analysis of kitsch or a Polish version of The Rocky Horror Show. Frankenstein, meaning everyman.’ Jolanta Kowalska, Teatra Szajner



PHOTO ©  MARCIN WEGNER / TEATR MUZYCZNY CAPITOL




 

MECENAS KULTURY:

   
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PATRONAT:

   
Trójka TVP2 wyborcza
Gazeta Wyborcza AMS Radio RAM
DlaStudenta Interia.pl Kulturaonline
PARTNERZY:

   
Muzeum Narodowe we Wrocławiu Hala Stulecia we Wrocławiu Restauracja Pergola
     
     

 

Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Doskonale dobrane kostiumy, upiorna w najlepszym tego słowa znaczeniu charakteryzacja, znakomita choreografia i ascetyczna scenografia, oparta na ekspresyjnych obrazach wideo, złożyły się na przedstawienie bardzo udane

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